FAQ Search Results

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I'd like to see colored bike lanes in my community. What color should we use and what impact with they have?

Many European countries use colored bike lanes to demarcate space for bicyclists and to draw motorists' attention to the bike lanes. The Danes use blue, the Dutch use red, the British use red or green, ...more >

What does the flashing DON'T WALK signal mean?

Oftentimes pedestrians are confused because the flashing DON'T WALK display appears before they finish crossing the street. Usually, there is nothing wrong with the traffic signal timing, there is just a misunderstanding of what the pedestrian signal means. ...more >

Is there widespread support for walking?

A national Surface Transportation Policy Project survey released in 2003 showed that many Americans are in favor of walking more places, and they are willing to invest what is necessary to make it possible. ...more >

Is it true that trails and bike paths are more dangerous than roads?

There's an oft-quoted statistic that riding on a bike paths is 2.6 times more dangerous than riding on the road. The number comes from a 1974 masters thesis study of adult cyclists that was used by author John Forester in his book & ...more >

How much does it cost to develop a bicycle and/or pedestrian plan?

It can vary widely, depending on the specific scope of the plan, but the range is probably somewhere between $25,000 and $500,000. Obviously the answer depends on a lot of variables and assumes that the development of the plan will likely be done by outside consultants. ...more >

How much does it cost to develop a bicycle and/or pedestrian plan?

It can vary widely, depending on the specific scope of the plan, but the range is probably somewhere between $25,000 and $500,000. Obviously the answer depends on a lot of variables and assumes that the development of the plan will likely be done by outside consultants. ...more >

Does the Federal government have a policy on bicycle access to interstates?

No. The Federal Highway Administration considers bike access to interstates strictly a state decision and has no policy on this issue. ...more >

Are bicyclists allowed to ride on the road?

Yes! In all 50 states, bicyclists are either considered vehicles or have the same rights and responsibilities as the operator of a motor vehicle. In general, bicyclists are legally allowed to ride their bikes on all public roads unless they have been specifically excluded, ...more >

How safe is it to bicycle on interstates?

A study of the nearly 4,000 bicycle fatalities in the United States between 1994 and 1998 found that seven bicyclists were killed on rural interstates. All seven riders were riding in the travel lane rather than on the shoulder. ...more >

Why don't we have enough time to cross? (Why does the WALK change to DON'T WALK before I finish crossing?)

Many people do not understand the meaning of the WALK/DON'T WALK pedestrian signals (or WALKING PERSON/UPRAISED HAND). Many pedestrians want to see the WALK signal during the entire crossing. This is simply not possible in many cases, ...more >