FAQ Search Results

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Why do people walk?

The 2001 National Household Travel Survey reports the following walking trip purposes: Trip Purposes as Percentage of Walking compared to Other Modes, 2001   Percentage of Walking Trips Percentage of Other Modes Social and Recreational 44. ...more >

Why don't people walk?

The 2002 National Survey of Pedestrian and Bicyclist Attitudes and Behaviors reports that one in five adults age 16 or older have either never walked or had not walked during a thirty-day period in the summer of 2002. ...more >

Which are the best cities for bicycling?

Bicycling Magazine tries to answer this question every couple of years. Their 2001 rankings are split into three different size categories; with the smallest city population included being 200,000 people. ...more >

What are effective ways to educate motorists about bicyclists' status and rights on the road?

As with many endeavors, education is a two-way street, and this is true when it comes to bicyclists and motorists sharing the road. Too often there are fingers pointed and blame assigned to others; the reality is: ...more >

Why doesn't our city install more traffic signals to help us cross the street?

Traffic signals are an important means of traffic control. When used properly (and where warranted) they can help improve safety, move more cars, and make it easier to cross the street. The number of crashes at an intersection ( ...more >

When should bicyclists ride on the sidewalk?

In general, bicyclists are better off using the road rather than the sidewalk. However, there may be times even confident cyclists sometimes choose to ride on the sidewalk because there is simply no safe place for them on the roadway. ...more >

How can my community improve yield-to-pedestrian compliance?

Drivers' failure to yield to pedestrians is a widespread problem that can be attributed to lack of knowledge, need for improved training programs, and inadequate mechanisms of accountability. Education programs backed up with vigorous enforcement measures often bring improvement. ...more >

Why don't we have enough time to cross? (Why does the WALK change to DON'T WALK before I finish crossing?)

Many people do not understand the meaning of the WALK/DON'T WALK pedestrian signals (or WALKING PERSON/UPRAISED HAND). Many pedestrians want to see the WALK signal during the entire crossing. This is simply not possible in many cases, ...more >

Why doesn't our city install more flashers to slow down traffic at pedestrian crossings?

Flashing yellow warning beacons, commonly called flashers, are frequently requested in the belief that they will reduce vehicle speeds and improve safety. Flashing beacons are generally helpful when used to alert drivers of an unexpected condition that is not readily apparent. ...more >