FAQ Search Results

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Does the Federal government have a policy on bicycle access to interstates?

No. The Federal Highway Administration considers bike access to interstates strictly a state decision and has no policy on this issue. ...more >

Are states and cities required to plan for bicycling and/or walking?

There is no legal requirement for states or cities to develop stand-alone bicycle and/or pedestrian plans. However, bicyclists and pedestrians must be considered in the statewide and metropolitan transportation plans required by Federal law ( ...more >

Are states and cities required to plan for bicycling and/or walking?

There is no legal requirement for states or cities to develop stand-alone bicycle and/or pedestrian plans. However, bicyclists and pedestrians must be considered in the statewide and metropolitan transportation plans required by Federal law ( ...more >

Are bicyclists allowed to ride on the road?

Yes! In all 50 states, bicyclists are either considered vehicles or have the same rights and responsibilities as the operator of a motor vehicle. In general, bicyclists are legally allowed to ride their bikes on all public roads unless they have been specifically excluded, ...more >

How safe is it to bicycle on interstates?

A study of the nearly 4,000 bicycle fatalities in the United States between 1994 and 1998 found that seven bicyclists were killed on rural interstates. All seven riders were riding in the travel lane rather than on the shoulder. ...more >

How important are bicycle facility and roadway maintenance to bicycle safety and access?

Proper bicycle facility and roadway maintenance may be one of the most important ways that states and local communities can improve the safety and accessibility of roads and shared-use paths to bicyclists. ...more >

Why don't we have enough time to cross? (Why does the WALK change to DON'T WALK before I finish crossing?)

Many people do not understand the meaning of the WALK/DON'T WALK pedestrian signals (or WALKING PERSON/UPRAISED HAND). Many pedestrians want to see the WALK signal during the entire crossing. This is simply not possible in many cases, ...more >

Why doesn't our city install more flashers to slow down traffic at pedestrian crossings?

Flashing yellow warning beacons, commonly called flashers, are frequently requested in the belief that they will reduce vehicle speeds and improve safety. Flashing beacons are generally helpful when used to alert drivers of an unexpected condition that is not readily apparent. ...more >

For uncontrolled pedestrian crossings (i.e. no traffic signal or stop sign is present), is it safer to have a marked or unmarked crosswalk?

Factors such as traffic volume, speed limit, number of lanes, median type, and pedestrian exposure affect the safety of marked and unmarked crosswalks. In most cases, a marked crosswalk alone is no safer - ...more >

How many bicycles are sold each year?

According to Bicycle Retailer and Industry News analysis of U.S. Commerce Department data, the total US Bicycle Market rose from 15.2 million in 1997 to 19.6 million in 2005. The economic recession of 2001 hit the bike market hard. ...more >