Enforcement Strategies in Campus Areas

Enforcement programs complement education programs and make sure that pedestrians, bicyclists, and drivers follow traffic rules and maximize the safety benefits of specific roadway designs. For more detail about general pedestrian and bicycle safety enforcement strategies, see the Enforcing Laws page.

Enforcement efforts at University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee

Enforcement efforts at University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
Photo by Robert J. Schneider

Campus-area pedestrian and bicycle law enforcement programs are often coordinated with campus and local police departments. A common approach to enforcement gives warnings to motorists and bicyclists who break pedestrian- and bicycle-related laws but allows violators to attend a pedestrian and bicycle safety class in lieu of a ticket. Many campuses also have police officers hand out safety informational material to motorists, bicyclists, and pedestrians at certain times of year. Some campuses have voluntary or mandatory bicycle registration to help increase recovery of stolen and abandoned bikes. Universities have also recommended or implemented a number of other innovative enforcement strategies, including:

    Crosswalk enforcement at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

    Enforcement efforts at University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
    Photo by Robert J. Schneider

  • Establish a Pedestrian Safety Month enforcement program. This effort targets distracted driving, speeding, and failure to yield to pedestrians. Police display purple ribbons on patrol cars during the month of increased pedestrian safety enforcement activity. (University of California with the City of Berkeley Police Department)
  • Offer night escort service, night shuttle, and emergency telephones throughout campus as well as shuttle stations and nearby parking areas
  • Use dedicated bicycle patrol officers to enforce pedestrian- and bicycle-related laws (University of California, Davis; University of California, San Diego, University of North Carolina-Greensboro, Clemson University)
  • Use student community service officers to assist the police department in giving warnings for pedestrian- and bicycle-related infractions. Have student officers place warnings on illegally parked bicycles. (University of Arizona; University of California, Davis)
  • Implement targeted enforcement efforts that focus on streets and intersections with known pedestrian and bicycle safety problems. These enforcement efforts may focus on reducing drivers speeding, drivers not yielding to pedestrians in crosswalks, pedestrians crossing against signals, bicyclists disobeying signals, bicyclists not riding with lights at night, and other behaviors that lead to crashes. (University of Arizona; University of North Carolina-Greensboro; East Carolina University)
  • Increase penalties for pedestrian- and bicycle-related infractions, starting by issuing warnings at the beginning of the school year and issuing tickets later in the school year (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign)
  • Impound or put a temporary lock on illegally parked or abandoned bicycles (University of California, San Diego; Boise State University)
  • Install security cameras in bicycle parking areas (College of Charleston)
Crosswalk enforcement at University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Enforcement efforts at University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee.
Photo by Robert J. Schneider

The PBIC Summary of Campus Pedestrian and Bicycle Plans and Studies spreadsheet provides more details about which universities have recommended these specific strategies.

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