Additional Training Options(two-day course)

For more training options, explore these programs:

  • NHI Pedestrian Facility Design Course

    • Description: This National Highway Institute (NHI) course was developed to provide information and application opportunities for those involved in the design of pedestrian facilities. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires newly constructed and altered sidewalks to be accessible and usable for people with disabilities, and accessibility improvements need to be implemented for existing facilities. To emphasize the importance of planning for pedestrians, the instruction centers on two case examples: one involving corridor design issues, one involving intersection design issues. Participants are engaged through lecture, discussion, video demonstrations of problem areas in corridors and intersections, small group problem identification, and the development of design alternatives.
    • Target Audience: Engineers with planning, design, construction, or maintenance responsibilities; pedestrian and bicycle specialists; planners; disability and orientation specialists; transportation planners, architects, landscape architects, as well as decision makers at the project planning level.
    • Length: 1.5 Days
    • Contact: NHI Training Program Manager Mila Plosky at (703) 235-0527 or mila.plosky@dot.gov. For technical information, contact John Fegan at (202) 366-5007 or john.fegan@dot.gov.
    • Web link: www.nhi.fhwa.dot.gov
  • Safe Routes to School National Course

    • Description: The SRTS National Course is intended for audiences at national, state, and local levels, and can be presented as a comprehensive overview of SRTS issues and programs or used to convene stakeholders and initiate steps to address concerns with walking conditions at the state or local level. The course is designed to help communities create sound programs that are based on community conditions, best practices and responsible use of resources.
    • Target Audience: Transportation engineers, planners, law enforcement officers, school administrators, parents, local advocates, community leaders and state decision makers
    • Length: 1 day
    • Contact: To request the course, visit the web site and then contact Nancy Pullen-Seufert by phone at 919-962-7419 or e-mail to pullen@hsrc.unc.edu.
    • Web link: http://www.saferoutesinfo.org/training/national_course/index.cfm
  • Walkable Community Workshops

    • Description: The National Center for Bicycling and Walking teaches Walkable Community Workshops that build alliances among elected officials, agencies, and citizen leaders to create safer and more welcoming accommodations for pedestrians. The goal of the workshop is to speed the creation of places where walking and bicycling are safe, viable transportation options. The workshop includes a discussion of the elements of a walkable community, examples of best practices, and a walking audit.
    • Target Audience: Staff from metropolitan planning organizations, cities, counties; community members; elected officials; and business leaders
    • Length: 1, 3, or 5 days
    • Contact: Bob Chauncey, Project Director, at (410) 570-5765 or bob@bikewalk.org ; or contact Mark Plotz, Program Manager, at (301) 656-4220 or mark@bikewalk.org.
    • Web link: http://www.bikewalk.org/workshopswalkable.php
  • APBP National Complete Streets Workshops

    • Description: Complete streets policies help communities create road networks that are safe and inviting for everyone, including bicyclists, drivers, transit operators and users, and pedestrians of all ages and abilities. The National Complete Streets workshops help state and local agencies develop and implement effective policies to routinely create complete streets. The National Complete Streets Coalition offers two interactive workshops developed with APBP to help you learn how to balance the needs of all users. Both workshops are led by national experts.
    • Policy Development Workshop: This interactive workshop helps state and local agencies develop effective policies to routinely create "complete" streets. In a collaborative process, participants review existing policies and internal procedures and work together to start to create a complete streets policy customized to the community, region, or state.
    • Policy Implementation Workshop: This interactive workshop uses a hands-on exercise based on a local street to learn a new six-step decision-making process for routinely including and balancing the needs of all users. Workshop participants also learn about the four steps to complete streets implementation and assess how well existing policy and implementation compare to an ideal complete streets policy.
    • Target Audience: Both workshops are designed for 30 participants targeting traffic engineering, public works, roadway design staff; transportation, community development, and land use planners; bicycle, pedestrian, and transit program staff; mayors, city, county and planning commissioners, and MPO Boards; and stakeholders and advocates for seniors, people with disabilities, children, walking, biking, transit, and health.
    • Length: 1 day each
    • Contact: For workshop prices and schedules, contact Linda Tracy by email at Linda@apbp.org or at 406-880-3880
    • Web link: http://www.apbp.org/?page=Complete_Streets
  • APBP Designing Pedestrian Facilities for Accessibility Course

    • Description: This newly updated course from the Association of Pedestrian and Bicycle Professionals includes both classroom and field work designed to increase your understanding of Public Right-of-Way Accessibility Guidelines (PROWAG) and Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) policies. Topics include legal policies, sidewalk design, crossings, intersections, curb ramps, construction, maintenance, pedestrian signals, and temporary traffic control. This course was developed collaboratively with the Federal Highway Administration and the U.S. Access Board.
    • Target Audience: Engineers, planners, designers with responsibility for planning, construction and/or maintenance of pedestrian facilities in the PROW, as well as public officials, pedestrian and disability advocates, and interested citizens. The optimal class size is 30–35 participants.
    • Length: The client/host can choose from 3 different courses. These courses vary in length and price as well as depth of instruction.
    • 1½ Day Course (approx. 12 hours) includes a PowerPoint presentation, instructor-led discussions, videos as well as classroom and field exercises that allow the participants to assess the accessibly of a facility and discuss possible design solutions.
    • 1 Day Course-Full (approx. 9 hours) includes a PowerPoint presentation, shortened instructor-led discussions, fewer videos as well as a smaller number of classroom and field exercises. The client/host must provide a box lunch for participants if this option is chosen.
    • 1 Day Course (approx. 8 hours) includes a PowerPoint presentation, shortened instructor-led discussions, fewer videos as well as a smaller number of classroom exercises and no field exercises.
    • Contact: To schedule a course or get more information, contact Julie Stelter by email at julie@apbp.org or at 262-385-1494.
    • Web link: http://www.apbp.org/?Access_Course
  • ITE Online Learning Gateway

    • Description: The Institute of Transportation Engineers Online Learning Gateway offers various opportunities to earn the necessary professional development hours and stay current in the field. Participants who successfully complete the final test that accompanies each course will earn professional development hours (PDH) and will be issued a Certificate of Completion. The courses are written by experts and reviewed by peers. Subject matter experts, selected by ITE, work closely with the design and development team to ensure that each course is relevant, current and worthwhile. A Program Content Advisory Committee, appointed by ITE, provides further technical advice.
    • ITE currently has eight online learning courses available:
    • Designing Accessible Pedestrian Facilities in the Public Rights-of-Way, Modules 1) Pedestrian Accessibility: Introduction and Context; 2) Planning for Accessible Pedestrian Rights-of-Way; 3) Accessible Sidewalks and Pedestrian Access; and 4) Accessible Pedestrian Crossings — This series of four individual courses is intended to provide a better understanding of the latest Public Rights-of-Way guidelines developed by the US Access Board, and how they can be applied in better designing sidewalks and intersections to accommodate persons with disabilities. Each of the four course modules is designed to be informative in the area of identifying the needs of persons with disabilities, provide practical engineering approaches to successfully addressing these needs on existing facilities, and serve as catalysts in promoting innovative solutions to similar challenges at future locations.
    • Transportation Planning-Site Impact Analysis — This course is part of the planning series and has been developed as a guided tutorial to assist transportation professionals in identifying the steps and tools involved in traffic access and impact studies for site development. A case study is used to illustrate the steps in the process.
    • Capacity Analysis-Signalized Intersections — The course is a guided tutorial that assists transportation professionals in applying the 2000 Highway Capacity Manual (HCM 2000) methodology for signalized intersection capacity analysis. Key concepts are explained using an interactive format and reinforced through a case study.
    • Safety Analysis-Signalized Intersections — The course is a guided tutorial that assists transportation professionals in analyzing crash data and identifying appropriate countermeasures to reduce the frequency of crashes and the fatalities, personal injury and property damage involved. Key concepts are explained using an interactive format and reinforced through a case study.
    • Traffic Control Devices-Traffic Signal Needs Determination — This course is part of the traffic control devices series and has been developed as a guided tutorial to assist staff engineers and technicians in using the methodology outlined in the Manual on Uniform Traffic Control Devices (MUTCD) 2000 for Traffic Control Signal Needs Study. The key concepts underpinning the process of determining signal needs are explained and case studies are used to illustrate the dependent variables.
    • Target Audience: The first four modules' principal target audience is transportation practitioners, designers, and planners. The other four courses are for anyone with a grasp of both algebra and English who seek professional development in the field.
    • Length: The first four modules will take approximately 2 hours each. The other courses will take approximately 6 hours each.
    • Contact: For technical assistance, please contact Zachary Pleasant, Information Services Manager, at 202-289-0222 ext. 120 or zpleasant@ite.org. For general information about Online Learning or ITE's Professional Development Program, please contact Aliyah N. Horton, Professional Development and Government Affairs Senior Director, at 202-289-0222 ext. 137 or at ahorton@ite.org.
    • Web link: http://www.ite.org/education